Finishing the tale of stone

In last year’s advents calendar, we presented the Master theses of two students. One of the students, Stian Aleksander Helsem has successfully defended his thesis this year. I still remember the first time we met. He came into my office being interested in writing his Master thesis with […]

A visit, a small boat, a worm = a new record of an invasive species and a paper

In October 2018, Vasily Radashevsky from the Russian Academy of Sciences briefly visited our collection to go through the material of Spionidae, marine worms of the phyla Annelida, the segmented worms. Vasily is very enthusiastic about spionids in all there facets and he is one of the world’s […]

Stygocapitella – an incredibly old worm found beneath your beach towel

Species of the genus Stygocapitella belong to the ringed worms, also known as Annelida. Annelids are worms like earthworms, lugworm or christmas tree worms, but also leeches or very tiny worms living in the spaces between the sand grains, called the interstitium. Such an interstitial group of worms […]

A new paper on Christmas tree worms from the Persian Gulf and the possible first case of heteroplasmy in Annelida

In pre-Covid times, Samaneh Pazoki has visited our lab for 6 months from Iran as part of her PhD. In the meantime, she has successfully defended her PhD and we could already publish a second paper as part of her stay her. She is interested in Serpulidae from […]

A US-Norwegian banker, Hawai’i and a spider genome – How do they come together for biodiversity research?

Written by Jose Cerca (former member of our group and now as a guest author on this blog) Spiders are some of the most charismatic animal lineages. Despite this, there are only a handful spider genomes available. This is likely due to their highly repeated and heterozygous genomes. […]

Biodiversity research in the Genomics era

Sequencing technology has changed in research in biology tremendously and probably much more than any other technology before. The development from radioactivity-based to nowadays single-molecule real-time sequencing of tens of thousands of base pairs in a single go in the last three decades is on par with the […]

Bad apples and a marine worm – sometimes they go together

During his PhD Jose was interested in the evolution of the cryptic species complexes in the annelid genus Stygocapitella, which occurs at sandy beaches around the world. Part of his thesis also comprised population-genomic studies to understand the underlying genomic background of morphological stasis. During the phylogenomic studies […]

What causes species not to change despite ongoing evolution?

Cryptic species have for long time been considered as purely a taxonomical challenge. However, in the last decade it has been shown that their recognition has also consequences for several other biological disciplines. Recently, their importance for understanding certain evolutionary processes has been highlighted. Most prominent among these […]

From the forest to the deep sea

This week a member of our group, Torsten Struck, published a review paper on the two annelid families Parergodrilidae and Orbiniidae together with Miguel Meca from the University Museum of Bergen as the first author and Anna Zhadan from the Lomonosov Moscow State University in the journal Diversity. […]

International Happy Seasons

We hope you enjoyed the wrap up of the year 2020 for the FEZ group as a traditional advent calendar. While setting up the various doors we noticed that we easily could have filled many more, indicating that it was a quite successful year despite all challenges. We are […]