Group of the Month: Diphyllobothrium

Known as broad or fish tapeworms, these spaghetti impersonators are some of the largest parasites that can infect humans. Transmitted to humans via undercooked or raw fish meat, Diphyllobothrium are found in fresh and marine waterways around the world. Characterized as flatworms, they are also considered pseudophyllidean cestodes, […]

The FEZ seminar series 2022 – a review

Keeping up with the literature and scientific discussions with colleagues in order to develop new ideas and projects and to reflect on old ones are important parts in the academic daily routines. The FEZ group runs together with colleagues from the SERG and EPA research groups at the […]

Group of the month: Parergodrilidae (Annelida)

This month’s ”Group of the month” is a bit of shameless self-promotion. I will present an animal group today, where we conduct quite a lot of research on. However, it is nonetheless really interesting and worth to learn more about it. The family Parergodrilidae belongs to the annelids […]

Door 24: Merry Christmas everyone from the FEZ research group

The previous 23 doors of the FEZ advent calendar 2022 opened every day for a paper published this year that group members found particularly interesting. The list is by no means exhaustive, but we hope you found the presentations inspiring. Maybe you will download and read one of […]

Door 23: Bugs in a teacup!

Door 23! Advent is almost over and a new year is on the horizon – and with a new year comes new ideas and opportunities in life and research alike. For my article, I’ve chosen to present “The bug in a teacup—monitoring arthropod–plant associations with environmental DNA from […]

Door 22: Tapping into Personal Genetics from Keepsakes – Breakthroughs and Concerns

Direct to consumer genetic testing of family heirlooms and keepsakes (e.g., used stamps, baby teeth) provide insight into genealogy and ancestry. Published earlier this month, one of the direct consequences of the sequencing revolution and increasing affordability of genetic testing has been direct to consumer (DTC) services and […]

Door 21: Insects are fun!

Among my favorite papers of 2022, as always, are the quarterly contributions to the American Entomoligist by May R. Berenbaum: “Terms of Art and Terms of Arthropods” https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmac051, “Sew-Sew Jokes” https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmac032, and “Bowl Games” https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmac006. Dr Berenbaum can write about anything related to entomology, and this year her […]

Door 20: Graham Budd – one of the greatest paleontologists of our time

As previously said, during this year FEZ advent calendar I have decided to briefly present you three works: a research paper, a researcher interview, and a book. For this occasion, my last contribution to this year FEZ advent calendar series, I would like to point out a publication […]

Door 19: A mysterious crustacean

For my second entry in our advent calendar, I will again present a taxonomic paper. This time it is surprisingly not about worms, but about a rather intriguing group of crustaceans, Facetotecta (Figure 1). It is a small group of about 14 species, all in the genus Hansenocaris. […]

Door 18: Ancestors in Evolutionary Biology: Linear Thinking about Branching Trees

As commented on a previous post of this 2022 Frontiers in Evolutionary Zoology advent calendar I have decided to briefly present you three works: a research paper, a researcher interview, and a book. Today, it is the turn of posting one of my favorite scientific books of the year. At least in life […]