Door 21: Insects are fun!

Among my favorite papers of 2022, as always, are the quarterly contributions to the American Entomoligist by May R. Berenbaum: “Terms of Art and Terms of Arthropods” https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmac051, “Sew-Sew Jokes” https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmac032, and “Bowl Games” https://doi.org/10.1093/ae/tmac006. Dr Berenbaum can write about anything related to entomology, and this year her topics range from insects as pet food to legal battles over whether bees are fish (it turns out the answer to the last question depends on the state). No matter what she writes about it is always funny. Any topic that does not even sound serious is rigorously pursued down to its origin in much detail and in a context of historical facts most of us do not know about. To let you have as much fun as I had reading these three papers I simply refer you to the three 2022 issues of the American Entomologist.

Did you know that entomology jokes have a very long lifetime? Here is one published in 1895:

Professor: How many legs have insects?

Candidate: Five percent of insects have no legs at all; 11 percent have one, 14 percent two to three, 10 percent four and five, but none six.

Professor: How in the world did you get this answer?

Candidate: By carefully examining the collection in the Hamilton College.

(Ent. News, 1895)

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